Simulation Workflows and Sustainable Design

To use fewer resources and reduce the impact of human activity, designers and engineers must use their expertise, along with advanced tools, improve the efficiency and effectiveness of what we build and make. One tool to optimize these designs is computer simulation. Here you will learn the basics of how and when to use Finite Element Analysis and Computational Fluid Dynamics for sustainable design.

Year Published: 
2013

Audience: 

This publication is for engineering students and professionals who are interested in doing computational fluid dynamics or finite element analysis for the first time, and would like to follow a strategic workflow to help improve the performance of their designs. This was originally published as part of the Autodesk Sustainability Workshop.

Software Covered: 

Simulation for Sustainable Product Design

To use fewer resources and treat the surrounding environment in a better manner, designers and engineers must use their expertise, along with advanced tools, to reduce the impact of our actions and consumption.  One of these tools is computer simulation.  Here you will learn the basics of how and when to use simulation for sustainable design.

Computational Fluid Dynamics

Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is the industry standard method for simulating the flow of gasses and liquids both through and around solid bodies (think of the flow around a car, or through a faucet).

Finite Element Analysis

Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is the current industry standard method for solving complex mechanical problems using computers.

Authors

Adam
Kenvarg
Adam Kenvarg did a wide variety of work for the Sustainability team as Autodesk’s Sustainability Education Fellow in 2012 and 2013. In this role, his focus was on creating learning resources to make designing sustainable products easier and more accessible. He has a degree in mechanical engineering from Olin College of Engineering and is pursuing his master’s degree in mechanical engineering through the Joint Program in Design at Stanford University.